Diagnoses

Diagnoses

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, pri at soleat ponderum dissentiet. Modus recteque vix id. Reque error suavitate et ius. Ad sea suas accumsan insolens. Pri nostrum moderatius te, vis iudico euismod disputando et. Per ut detracto definitionem, dicant veritus adipiscing cu eos. Alienum maluisset nec et. An duo atqui melius consetetur.

no solum fierent referrentur has. Ne quem mundi accusamus mel. Diam erant qualisque ne eam. Eam te platonem vulputate forensibus, diam veri tation ex pri. His debet debitis ea, ad omittam platonem torquatos vis. Vis te possim appareat phaedrum, ubique volutpat efficiantur est in.

Our rigorously screened, bonded and insured Qualified Caregivers have prior experience working with clients who have the following diagnoses:

Having a hand to hold allows me to stay in my home

Allow your loved one to maintain their happiness!
recovery services

What's New At Elan Gardens Senior Living?

Elan Gardens Senior Living: Important Considerations When Exploring Personal Care or Nursing Home Care Options

Elan Gardens Senior Living: Important Considerations When Exploring Personal Care or Nursing Home Care Options

A common question among seniors and families looking into care options for themselves or their loved ones is whether to consider skilled nursing or personal care. Knowing the difference is important in making that decision.

An honest personal assessment of needs is the first step. Both settings offer:

  • Private or semi-private accommodations
  • Assistance with day-to-day activities, such as medication management, personal hygiene, bathing, dressing, using the bathroom, etc.,
  • 24-hour supervision, monitoring and care support,
  • Nutritious meals in a social setting,
  • Housekeeping and laundry services;
  • Activities and social programs;
  • Memory care programming;
  • A care team that become friends and family, and
  • Both settings are licensed and routinely inspected.

While there are many similarities in the care and services provided in each of these settings, there are some rather distinct differences.

  • Amount of Daily Help Needed – Nursing homes provide a higher staffing ratio and can care for individuals who need more assistance in their day – to – day activities. Typically, those who need the assistance of more than one staff member to safely perform day-to-day activities or who use equipment in order to transfer between surfaces, such as mechanical lifts, are often limited to nursing home care.  Each personal care home determines how much care they can safely provide; however, nursing homes provide an average of 3 hours of nursing care to each resident on a daily basis while personal care homes typically provide between 1 and 2 hours of care to each resident daily.
  • Medical Care – Nursing homes provide most of an individual’s medical care at the facility. A physician is required to evaluate nursing home residents on a routine basis and be available for consultation on changes of condition on a 24/7 basis.  Personal care homes typically assist individuals with arranging for medical care that is often provided at the physician office. Staff are available at all times in the case of an emergency, but if medical evaluation or care is needed, the individual will likely be transferred to the local Emergency Department for medical care.
  • Skilled Nursing Care – Nursing homes can provide skilled nursing care and certain medical treatments, such as wound care, intravenous care, therapy services, etc., while all of the care provided at a personal care home is such as assistance with day- to -day activities. Personal care home residents who need skilled care can sometimes receive those services while living at the personal care home through a Medicare–certified home health provider.
  • Payment Options – Medicare, Medicaid, and other third party insurances will often pay for all or a portion of nursing home care based on an individual’s qualifying condition(s). Payment options for personal care homes are limited to private pay resources and Veterans benefits.  War era veterans and their spouses may qualify for Aid and Attendance benefits, which will help cover the cost of care in a personal care home but not fully fund it.
  • Regulatory Standards -While both settings are licensed and routinely inspected, their licensing agencies and minimum standards are different. Nursing homes are under a more stringent set of regulatory requirements and are inspected by the PA Department of Health.     Personal care homes regulatory requirements are less stringent and allow individuals more autonomy in their care and lifestyle than a nursing home.
  • Finances – Nursing Home care is more expensive than personal care because of the higher staffing ratios, increased regulatory requirements, and higher care needs of the residents living there. Individuals who do not have the financial means to pay for care through their own private resources may qualify for Medical Assistance, which only pays for nursing home care.  There are often limited options for personal care for individuals who do not have the financial resources to pay the monthly costs.  Nursing home care averages $9,000 per month while personal care typically ranges between $4,000-6,000 per month.

In short:

  • A personal care facility provides assistance with day-to-day activities, offers more autonomy with daily decision-making, and is more cost-effective.
  • A skilled nursing facility provides higher levels of assistance with day-to-day activities, can provide skilled services on a 24/7 basis for individuals with medically necessary needs, and is covered by third party insurances.

Elan Gardens Senior Living, A Jewish Senior Life Community, formerly known as Elan Gardens, is located in South Abington Township in Northeastern Pennsylvania, and welcomes seniors looking for a caring community to call home. Residents value our quality care, as well as the emphasis we place on independence. We tailor our services to the individual needs of our residents so they can get the assistance they need, while retaining their individual lifestyle.

As a non-profit community, all of our goals are focused on accomplishing our mission: to offer a supportive residential environment dedicated to maintaining each individual’s strengths, abilities, and autonomy while providing the resources to further enhance the quality of their lives.

Elan Gardens Senior Living brings our mission to life with the support of our sister community, Elan Skilled Nursing and Rehab (formerly The Jewish Home of Eastern Pennsylvania), which offers skilled nursing home care such as short stay rehabilitation and enhanced dementia care.

It is always a difficult decision for a senior to move from their home. Well-intentioned family members often think that their parent or loved one needs to move from living independently in the community directly to a nursing home.  A personal care home is a great in –between option that provides assistance to the senior, but allows more autonomy in their day-to-day decision-making.

To learn more about Elan Gardens Senior Living, please give us a call at 570-585-4400.

Our name has changed, but Elan Gardens Senior Living remains focused on our mission

Our name has changed, but Elan Gardens Senior Living remains focused on our mission

Dear Families and Friends, Over the past year, our Board of Directors has implemented strategies that more closely align us with our sister organizations, the Jewish Home of Eastern Pennsylvania and Webster Towers. We strive to more accurately represent the three entities as a provider of a full continuum of senior care. We look forward to investing further to enhance…

February 25, 2022, Letter to friends and families

February 25, 2022, Letter to friends and families

Our main priority is the protection of our residents, staff and families at our facility. We are monitoring COVID-19 data and its impact. As for visitations, we welcome you but encourage all to continue to follow safety tips in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance. These are important safeguards for residents and staff. Our healthcare guidelines…

Alzheimer’s/Dementia

Alzheimer’s/Dementia refers to a serious loss of mental abilities such as thinking, remembering, reasoning and communicating. Dementia is not a normal part of aging. It can be difficult to know whether you or your loved one is suffering from Alzheimer’s/Dementia as the symptoms typically appear gradually (beginning with memory loss).

Saveo knows from personal and professional experience that caring for a loved one suffering from Alzheimer’s/Dementia can be physically, emotionally and mentally exhausting.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Cancer

Cancer is a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Not all tumors are cancerous; benign tumors do not spread to other parts of the body. Possible signs and symptoms include a lump, abnormal bleeding, prolonged cough, unexplained weight loss.

While these symptoms may indicate cancer, they may have other causes. Over 100 types of cancers affect humans. Tobacco use is the cause of about 22% of cancer deaths.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease in which the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord are damaged. This damage disrupts the ability of parts of the nervous system to communicate, resulting in a range of signs and symptoms, including physical, mental, and sometimes psychiatric problems.

Specific symptoms can include double vision, blindness in one eye, muscle weakness, trouble with sensation, or trouble with coordination. MS takes several forms, with new symptoms either occurring in isolated attacks.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Parkinson’s

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system. The symptoms generally come on slowly over time. Early in the disease, the most obvious are shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, and difficulty with walking. Thinking and behavioral problems may also occur.

Dementia becomes common in the advanced stages of the disease. Depression and anxiety are also common occurring in more than a third of people with PD. Other symptoms include sensory, sleep, and emotional problems.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal

Stroke

A stroke is when poor blood flow to the brain results in cell death. There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding. They result in part of the brain not functioning properly. Signs and symptoms of a stroke may include an inability to move or feel on one side of the body.

Signs and symptoms often appear soon after the stroke has occurred. If symptoms last less than one or two hours it is known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or mini-stroke. A stroke may also be associated with a headache.

  • Memory loss
  • Disorientation
  • Confusion about time or place
  • Communication issues
  • Inability to read, write, speak or understand
  • Mood and behavior changes, such as aggressiveness, wandering or withdrawal